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HOME > Iran >The towns 

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Iran towns


  1. ABOUT TEHERAN

  2. ABOUT HAMADAN

  3. ABOUT ESFAHAN

  4. ABOUT BAM

ABOUT TEHERAN

Definitely the Iranian capital is not the most beautiful one in the world, on the opposite  it could seem one of the ugliest: traffic and pollution are the main ingredients of this twelve million inhabitants city. In Santiago, B. Aires, Los Angeles, Chicago, Dakar I've never had problems breathing, but in Teheran I got my throat inflamed.
In the city it's quite tough orienting, since there's no centre but just long large streets run along by "dangerous unfenced dirty deep spooky" channels. Crossing the streets, if you'll be able to jump the channel probably you'll knocked down by some crazy driver.
After having discouraged you enough visiting Teheran, I can report you some its positive features: first of all the Elburz mountains are the background of the city that you'll enjoy from every its corner. Moreover it's very representative of the Iranian development (or undevelopment according to the point of view), thus, it's the place freest from the most severe Islamic restrictions; you can write a email or buy  something particular that you don't find elsewhere in Iran. Besides it's very near to some ski slopes you can enjoy in a daytrip.
I had no problems walking alone through the town in the evening, as , anyway, everywhere else in Iran. Frankly here I had  a funny, and somehow scaring, meeting with a public bus driver whose behaviour I wholly misunderstood since I was just arrived in Iran and I wasn't enough trustful of the people: read the funny story about it!

In short Teheran isn't worth a dedicated long divert to visit it, nevertheless, since surely you'll pass by it, don't miss a glance!

 

 

ABOUT HAMADAN

I went to Hamadan mainly to visit the Alý Sadr caves  (100 km  northward). Hamadan is not a tourist highlight since there are no very interesting attractions. Nevertheless I advice you to visit it: first of all for the caves that are very nice and I found out funny the trip in the darkness with the pedal boat; anyway it is something different than the mosques with the minarets that you'll found in any corner elsewhere in Iran. Even more charming than the caves I found the landscape on the way. It's a 100 km ride in a desert with some snowed spots on a tiny minibus (in February), where I experienced the severity of the islamic rules (read the funny story). Further more Hamdan belongs to the west part of Iran that is so different from the rest of the country: the environment is greener and the temperature is definitely colder. The town is more lively but also colourless. The cultural level seems higher and more open-minded compared to the other towns I've visited, in fact I've met several English speaker, moreover the girls seem less shy or scared to communicate.
In short it's another face of Iran, a piece of the puzzle of this country to be completed in your mind.


PS: unfortunately I found someone who, unsuccessfully,  tried to swindle me (read about the tips)

 

 

ABOUT ESFAHAN

Anywhere you gonna go in Iran, don't miss Esfahan!!!

Definitely I've spent the most interesting and enjoying 5 days I've ever spent travelling. First of all the town is so beautiful: in particular its huge square (the third one biggest in the world), the five km bazaar that skirts it, the awesome mosques, the bridges..

Furthermore the inhabitants are so hospitable: I were in a cab when a man invited me in his house for dinner (and I went, obviously), another one stopped me in the street offering me a breakfast, two guys, eager to speak to a foreign, invited me in their houses for a tea with their family, other guys I met in the square invited me to a lunch with their friends..
It has been  simply amazing!
Besides I was surprised by the kind of traveller I met here. In fact Esfahan, thanks to his geographical position, unlike Teheran, is an obliged crossing point for everybody travelling from Turkey to Pakistan (or viceversa). Consequently I met people who were travelling for months from Asia to Europe around the world. I remember a small cute Japanese girl who had been travelling for 4 months alone in Egypt, Siria, Israel, Turkey, Iran, heading eastward, or an English girl biking alone from India through the Iranian desert, heading back to England. So interesting people whose meeting made my stay in Esfhan worthwhile.

  
Thanks to Micheal (an Austrian guy) for his company in Esfahan

 

 

ABOUT BAM

Bam is a kind of big oasis at the bottom of one of the two iranian desert. The highlight is the arg-e-Bam (the old town of Bam), a formed citadel built just by mud on the border between the oasis and the desert. Now it's a kinda of big labyrinth where I spent hours just hanging out through the narrow streets. From the top of the tower set at the centre of the citadel you can enjoy the view of the desert northward and of the palm trees southward. You can drink a tea in the tea house inside the citadel and meet Iranian people eager to speak with you!
Beside this citadel, Bam is a nice town to be visited, where I met very nice people and hanged out with other travellers exchanging travelogues.

On the opposite, one spooky experience regarding Bam has been to reach it by a night bus trip from Shiraz..uhm..awful. I promise you, just the African bus trips in Mali has been worse!

 

Thanks to Gabriel and Clara (two Spanish travellers)    for their company during our adventures in Bam and Bandar-e-Abbass

 

 

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